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World’s largest iceberg drifting to its doom

Despite the long journey, the iceberg’s size remains remarkably unchanged.

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In October 2022, a clearing in the clouds revealed Antarctic iceberg A-76A floating in the Drake Passage. (NASA EO/Terra MODIS via SWNS)

By Dean Murray via SWNS

The World’s largest iceberg is drifting to its doom.

NASA confirmed Antarctic iceberg A-76A - which is about twice the size of London or Rhode Island- is being swept away to the warmer waters of the equator.

A clear day in October allowed the space agency's Terra satellite to spot the huge, geometric piece of ice floating in the Drake Passage.

A-76A is the biggest remaining piece of what was once the largest iceberg floating in the world’s oceans.

In October 2022, a clearing in the clouds revealed Antarctic iceberg A-76A floating in the Drake Passage. (NASA EO/Terra MODIS via SWNS)

It is about 84 miles long and 16 miles wide.

The iceberg’s parent berg (A-76) broke from Antarctica’s Ronne Ice Shelf in May 2021.

At the time, it was the largest iceberg anywhere on the planet. Within a month, the iceberg lost that status when it broke into three named pieces.

The largest of those pieces—Iceberg A-76A—now drifts nearly 2,000 kilometres (1,200 miles) away in the Drake Passage.

The passage is a turbulent body of water between South America’s Cape Horn and Antarctica’s South Shetland Islands.

"It remains to be seen where A-76A will drift next. It is already more than 500 kilometers north of its position in July 2022, when the European Space Agency’s Sentinel-1 satellite showed the berg passing the Antarctic Peninsula," said NASA Earth Observatory.

"As they continue to drift north, icebergs are usually pushed east by the powerful Antarctic Circumpolar Current funneling through the Drake Passage.

mage from Copernicus Sentinel-1 mission shows world’s largest iceberg - named A-76 - breaking off from the Ronne Ice Shelf, lying in the Weddell Sea in Antarctica. (ESA via SWNS)

"From that point, icebergs often whip north toward the equator and quickly melt in the area’s warmer waters."

Despite the long journey, the iceberg’s size remains remarkably unchanged.

In June 2021, the U.S. National Ice Center (USNIC) reported that A-76A measured 135 kilometers long and 26 kilometers wide—a total area equal to about twice the size of London.

In October 2022, USNIC reported that the iceberg maintained the same dimensions.

The iceberg was captured in a natural-color image, acquired on October 31, 2022, with the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Terra satellite.

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